The Many Roles in FaithHealth

It takes all kinds of folks to do the work of FaithHealth, to help bring health to the most vulnerable people. Here are some of them.

These should make sense in any community

Community Heath Workers

Full-time staff who connect clients with primary care appointments and medication, complete insurance paperwork, deliver food and more.

Congregations

Volunteers extend compassionate care beyond the walls of the medical center and agencies. Combine caregiving and capacity building.

FaithHealth Connectors

Part-time, lightly funded. Already trusted in some community or network. Provide hands-on caregiving, such as delivering meals. Recruit and train volunteers.

Faith Community Nurses

How faith communities often function like an organic social immune system during times of crisis, particularly our current COVID-19 pandemic.

Visiting Clergy

Partners in the health and well-being of patients and their families. Trusted by congregants and are often leaders in community health issues.

Quick Response Teams

Visit overdose victims during the “recovery window” to check in, share resources and ask: Are you ready to enter a program?

FaithHealth Fellows

How faith communities often function like an organic social immune system during times of crisis, particularly our current COVID-19 pandemic.

And so should these new kinds of Chaplains

Embedded First Responder Chaplains

They answer the calls of the first responders. Deployed as integral, embedded members of emergency response teams

FaithHealth Chaplain Managers

Serve as traditional chaplains to those in the hospitals, but also help connect patients and family with support outside of the hospital walls.

Discover & align your assets. Each community has unique possibilities.  Here’s some of what we found in ours:

CareNet Counselors

Licensed mental health professionals who provide education and support for clients and families through 37 centers across North Carolina.

Community Radio

How faith communities often function like an organic social immune system during times of crisis, particularly our current COVID-19 pandemic.